Archives / 2012 Sundance Film Festival

Young & Wild

Film Still Film Still Film Still Film Still

Director: Marialy Rivas

Screenwriters: Camila Gutiérrez, Pedro Peirano, Marialy Rivas, Sebastián Sepúlveda

Institute History

  • 2012 Sundance Film Festival

Description

Daniela is a petite, pretty teenager raised in the bosom of a strict and well-to-do evangelical family in Santiago, Chile. Daniela is also a 17-year-old who finds that her raging sexual drive is difficult to reconcile with the orders of her religion. With no outlet for her desire, Daniela taps into a rampant underground network of other horny teenagers through her sexually charged blog. As she types the gospel of her life as a fornicator online, Daniela still goes to church and prays to Jesus, “Lord, see to it that Mother doesn’t type jovenyalocada.blogspot.com!"

Director Marialy Rivas’s handsome debut feature is a playful and energetic coming-of-age story about a young woman who refuses to make choices that limit her pleasure. Brought to life by an attractive cast, led by the enigmatic Alicia Rodríguez, Young & Wild romps through the burning fires of religious fervor and youthful sexual energy to deliver a delightful portrait of contemporary teenage life in Santiago.

Award Winner
World Cinema Screenwriting Award

— S.F.

Screening Details

Sundance Film Festival Awards

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